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SURGICAL SUITES: Guidelines on best practices to prevent surgical site infections

The number of unresolved issues in this guideline reveals substantial gaps that warrant future research.” (page E6)

Best practices in avoiding surgical site infections were studied by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention with the assistance of the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee.  This guideline is based on the full text review of nearly 900 journal articles and studies.  The guideline is organized according to specific surgical practices – for example the efficacy of wearing a space suit during orthopedic surgery – and assigns each practice a rating on a continuum as to whether the practice is highly recommended, unresolved, or somewhere in between.  The rating on the space suits, for instance, is that it is unresolved.

Source: Berrios-Torres, S.I., and others. (2017, May 3). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guideline for the prevention of surgical site infection 2017. JAMA Surgery. Click here: http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamasurgery/fullarticle/2623725  Posted by AHA Resource Center (312) 422-2050, rc@aha.org

POPULATION HEALTH: Are these battles winnable?

An estimated 400,000 people quit smoking between 2012 and 2016 – one of the successful initiatives of the “Winnable Battles” campaign begun by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2010.  The outcomes of this program five years later are reviewed in this report and summarized in the JAMA article.  The idea was to target a carefully-chosen set of public health issues and then devote federal, state and local resources to improving them.

Here is a summary of what happened five years on:

  1. Clear success in decreasing adult and teen smoking
  2. Likewise, exceeded the target in decreasing teen pregnancies
  3. Making good progress on most measures of reducing healthcare-associated infections – except catheter-associated urinary tract infections
  4. Slow progress on measures related to nutrition, exercise, obesity
  5. Slow progress on reducing foodborne illness
  6. Slow progress on reducing motor vehicle deaths
  7. Mixed results on measures related to HIV

Sources:

Winnable battles: Final report. (2016, November). Atlanta: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Click here: https://www.cdc.gov/winnablebattles/report/docs/winnable-battles-final-report.pdf; and, Frieden, T.R., Ethier, K., ad Schuchat, A. (2017, February 2). Improving the health of the United States with a “winnable battles’ initiative. JAMA. Click here: http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2601246  Posted by AHA Resource Center (312) 422-2050, rc@aha.org