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TURNAROUNDS: How to effect change quickly at a struggling hospital using ‘buddying’ mentoring approach

How a buddying partnership was used to implement a quality improvement initiative at Medway NHS Foundation Trust, a large general hospital located near London, England, is described in this detailed case study.  Medway’s partner in the buddying agreement was Guys and St. Thomas’ Hospitals Hospital NHS Foundation, which provided “advice, operational assistance, ‘compassionate’ leadership and pastoral staff…”  This team approach was successful in quickly improving patient throughput issues.

Source: Leach, R., Banerjee, S., Beer, G., and others. (2019). Supporting a hospital in difficulty: Experience of a ‘buddying’ agreement to implement a new medical pathway. Future Healthcare Journal, 6(1), 67-75. Click here for full text:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6520082/pdf/futurehealth-6-1-67.pdf  Posted by AHA Resource Center (312) 422-2050,  rc@aha.org

MODELS OF CARE: Geographic unit-based teams case study

Redesign of the care model for inpatient units at Brooklyn Hospital Center (NY, 464 beds)  is described in this article.  Previously, hospital medicine teams would round on patients scattered about the hospital.  After the redesign, geographic unit-based teams were created.  How staff handled the transition to the new model and interactions with the bed board system are discussed.  Workstations on wheels (WOWs) were added to rounds.  Provider and patient satisfaction were found to improve after implementation of the new model.

Source: Pendharkar, S., Malieckal, G., and Gasperino, J. (2019, May 10). Unit-based models of care. The Hospitalist.  Click here for full text:  https://www.the-hospitalist.org/hospitalist/article/200713/mixed-topics/unit-based-models-care  Posted by AHA Resource Center (312) 422-2050, rc@aha.org

Rural Obstetric Services: Access, Workforce, and Impact

A new research briefing looks at declining access for rural women to obstetric services. Between 2004 and 2014, 179 rural counties in the U.S. lost hospital-based obstetric services, with over half of rural counties now lacking these services. The distribution of rural counties without obstetrics services varies widely geographically, from 78% in Florida to 9% in Vermont.

Access to obstetric service factors may be related to lower birthrates, a limited rural obstetric workforce, Medicaid eligibility, and socio-economic factors. The impact of limited OB services is also briefly covered.

Links to the nine reports covered by the research overview — all from the University of Minnesota Rural Health Research Center — are  provided.

Source: Rural obstetric services: access, workforce, and impact. Rural Health Research Recap, Rural Health Research Gateway, April 2019. https://www.ruralhealthresearch.org/recaps/8

Posted by AHA Resource Center (312) 422-2050 rc@aha.org

COST OF HEALTH CARE: Specialist visits to hospitalized Medicare patients cost over $1.3 billion in 2014

What is the cost to the nation to bring in specialists to consult on hospitalized Medicare patients?  This question was studied based on analysis of over 700,000 discharges from over 4500 U.S. hospitals in 2014.  Medicare Part B payment for consultative care was found to represent 41.3 percent of all physician visits during the hospital stays.  The total dollar amount was estimated to be $1.3 billion.  These figures are thought to be underestimates because the patients studied excluded surgical patients and because there was no analysis of downstream costs – such as additional diagnostic testing and follow-up visits.  Characteristics of hospitals which were found to be more likely to have higher rates of consultative visits included those in the Northeast, those in urban areas and teaching hospitals.

Source: Ryskina, K.L., Association of Medicare spending with subspecialty consultation for elderly hospitalized adults. JAMA Network Open, 2(4).  Click here for full text:  https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2729802 Posted by AHA Resource Center (312) 422-2050 rc@aha.org

ED VISITS: Comparing utilization in urban and rural areas

Changes in emergency department utilization rates from 2005 to 2016 in urban versus rural areas were studied based on data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey.  The data used in the analysis are representative of the nation as a whole.  Here are the changes in visits per 100 population over the time period studied:

  • Rural areas: 36.5 visits/100 population (2005) to 64.5 visits/100 population (2016)
  • Urban areas: 40.2 visits/100 population (2005) to 42.8 visits/100 population (2016)

Reasons for the larger growth in the utilization rate per 100 population in rural areas are discussed.

Source: Greenwood-Ericksen, M.D., and Kocher, K. (2019, April 12). Trends in emergency department use by rural and urban populations in the United States. JAMA Network Open, 2(4). Full text here: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2730472  Posted by AHA Resource Center (312) 422-2050 rc@aha.org

Acute Care Hospital Closures and Openings, 2010-2016

The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission [MedPAC] has updated its annual chart on the number of openings and closures of acute care hospitals participating in the Medicare program:

According to the latest FY2017 AHA Annual Survey Database, about 98% of the nation’s acute care, non-federal hospitals participate in the Medicare program.

Source: MedPAC Databook: Section 6. Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, June 2018. http://www.medpac.gov/docs/default-source/data-book/jun18_databooksec6_sec.pdf?sfvrsn=0

Related source: North Carolina Rural Health Research Program. Rural hospital closures: January 2010-present. University of North Carolina, Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, accessed April 9, 2019 at http://www.shepscenter.unc.edu/programs-projects/rural-health/rural-hospital-closures/

Posted by AHA Resource Center (312) 422-2050, rc@aha.org

 

Drug Discount: Characteristics of Hospitals Participating and Not Participating in the 340B Program

The U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) released a report on the results of the study that analyzes the characteristics of hospitals that participate or do not participate in the 340B drug discount program. The GAO conducted this study due to the sixty percent increase from 2011 to 2016 in program participation, as well as the impact of Medicaid expansion on 340B participation.

The study was focused on three of the six hospital types, as they accounted for ninety five percent of U.S. hospitals participating in the 340B program. These three hospital types include:

  • Critical Access Hospitals (CAH)
  • Sole Community Hospitals (SCH)
  • General Acute Care Hospitals (Also Known As 340B DSH)

The full report can be found on the U.S. Government Accountability Office website, https://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-18-521R.

Posted by the AHA Resource Center, (312) 422-2050, rc@aha.org.