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BENCHMARKING: Housekeeping cost per square foot

The relationship between patient satisfaction with care received in the hospital, as measured by the Medicare star ratings, and housekeeping cost was studied based on data from nearly 3,500 hospitals.  The authors of this very brief report note that the findings are intuitive – spend more money on housekeeping and patients will be more satisfied –  except for the oddly low cost per square foot for the 5-star rated hospitals.  Here are some of the reported findings:

Housekeeping Cost per Patient Day: 5-star is the best rating

  • $174.98 for 5-star rated hospitals
  • $103.82 for 4-star rated hospitals
  • $  85.16 for 3-star rated hospitals
  • $  75.98 for 2-star rated hospitals
  • $  75.93 for 1-star rated hospitals

Housekeeping Cost per Square Foot: 5-star is the best rating

  • $2.80 for 5-star rated hospitals
  • $6.73 for 4-star rated hospitals
  • $4.96 for 3-star rated hospitals
  • $3.83 for 2-star rated hospitals
  • $4.34 for 1-star rated hospitals

Source: The importance of a clean hospital room, according to patients. (2017, April). Healthcare Financial Management, 71(4), 78-79.  Click here for publisher’s website: https://www.hfma.org/Content.aspx?id=53567    Posted by AHA Resource Center (312) 422-2050, rc@aha.org

PHYSICIANS: Average salary offers to recruited specialists

For the eleventh consecutive year, family physicians topped the list of Merritt Hawkins’ 20 most requested recruiting assignments, underscoring the continued urgent demand for primary care physicians in an evolving healthcare system.”

Each year, the physician recruiting firm Merritt Hawkins provides aggregate data based on the many recruiting assignments completed during the previous year.  The data in this report cover nearly 3,300 search assignments from the first quarter 2016 to the first quarter 2017.

RECRUITING OFFERS:  Base Salary / Guaranteed Income (average) [Excludes production bonus; excludes benefits]

  • $120,000 Physician assistant
  • $123,000 Nurse practitioner
  • $231,000 Family Medicine
  • $240,000 Pediatrics
  • $257,000 Internal Medicine
  • $263,000 Psychiatry
  • $264,000 Hospitalist
  • $305,000 Neurology
  • $335,000 Obstetrics/Gynecology
  • $349,000 Emergency Medicine
  • $376,000 Anesthesiology
  • $390,000 Pulmonology/Critical Care
  • $411,000 General Surgery
  • $421,000 Dermatology
  • $428,000 Cardiology (non-invasive)
  • $436,000 Radiology
  • $468,000 Otolaryngology
  • $492,000 Gastroenterology
  • $563,000 Cardiology (invasive)
  • $579,000 Orthopedic Surgery

Source: Merritt Hawkins (2017). 2017 review of physician and advanced practitioner recruiting incentives.  Dallas: MH.  Click here: https://www.merritthawkins.com/physician-compensation-and-recruiting.aspx  Posted by AHA Resource Center (312) 422-2050 rc@aha.org

NICUs: What is a small baby unit?

Small baby units take the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) concept to a new level by specializing in the care of the smallest babies – known as micro-preemies – born at fewer than 27 weeks gestation and/or weighing less than 1,000 grams (2.2 pounds).  The design of the units, which are part of a larger NICU, includes providing a dark, quiet environment.  Parents are encouraged to participate in skin-to-skin care (SSC) techniques that fosters bonding, such as Kangaroo Mother Care.  Caregivers are teamed up to deliver two-person care when the micro-preemies need to be touched.  As the babies grow, they may be transitioned out of the small baby unit to the NICU.

Hospitals with Small Baby Units (this is not a comprehensive list)

  • Advocate Lutheran General Hospital (Park Ridge, IL)
  • Children’s Hospital (Orange, CA)
  • Greenville Health System (Greenville, SC)
  • Helen Devos Children’s Hospital (Grand Rapids, MI)
  • Mercyhealth Hospital-Rockton Avenue (Rockford, IL)
  • Nationwide Children’s Hospital (Columbus, OH)

Sources:

Gonya, J., and others. (2017). Investigating skin-to-skin care patterns with extremely preterm infants in the NICU and their effect on early cognitive and communication performance: A retrospective cohort study. BMJ Open, 7.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5372108/pdf/bmjopen-2016-012985.pdf

GHS launches NICU small baby unit. (2017, May 12). WSPA-TV. http://wspa.com/2017/05/12/ghs-launches-nicu-small-baby-unit/

Jackson, A. (2015, December 9).  Born at 25 weeks weighing less than 2 pounds, ‘spunky’ girl survives in small baby unit. MLive. http://www.mlive.com/news/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2015/12/small_baby_nicu_at_devos_child.html

Morris, M., Cleary, P., and Soliman, A. (2015, October). Small baby unit improves quality and outcomes in extremely low birth weight infants. Pediatrics, 136(4).  http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/pediatrics/136/4/e1007.full.pdf

Watley, K. (2017, February 6). Mercyhealth in Rockford opens region’s first small baby unit to care for micro-preemies. https://mercyhealthsystem.org/mercyhealth-opens-small-baby-unit-rockford/

Woloshyn, E. (2017, April 20). Special unit mimics mother’s womb. Health enews.

http://www.ahchealthenews.com/2017/04/20/special-unit-mimics-mothers-womb/  Posted by AHA Resource Center (312) 422-2050 rc@aha.org

POPULATION HEALTH: 678,383 ESRD patients in US (2014)

Each year, there are about 120,000 patients newly diagnosed with end stage renal disease (ESRD) and this number has been rising steadily.  Here are the exact counts of incidence – that is, new cases treated in the U.S.:

  •   77,018 new ESRD cases in 1996
  •   94,662 new cases in 2000
  • 106,662 new cases in 2005
  • 115,920 new cases in 2010
  • 120,688 new cases in 2014

The prevalence of end stage renal disease – the total number of patients who are living with the disease at any given point in time – has more than doubled during the 1996 to 2014 time period.  Here are the exact prevalence counts:

  • 303,311 total ESRD cases in 1996
  • 390,158 total cases in 2000
  • 484,935 total cases in 2005
  • 591,776 total cases in 2010
  • 678,383 total cases in 2014

What kind of treatment do ESRD patients receive?

Looking at the entire population of patients with end stage renal disease, about two-thirds are on hemodialysis – usually received in a dialysis center.   Another seven percent are on peritoneal dialysis.  The balance (30 percent) have received a kidney transplant.  These percentages are based on 2014 data.

Geographic differences

There are substantial differences in the incidence of kidney failure in different parts of the country.  Areas with the highest rates of new end stage renal disease patients include Texas and Southern California, while New England states have the lowest rates.

Source: United States Renal Data System. (2016). Incidence, prevalence, patient characteristics, and treatment modalities. In Annual data report 2016: Epidemiology of kidney disease in the United States. (Vol. 2, Chapt. 1). Ann Arbor, Michigan: USRDS Coordinating Center. Click here for free full text https://www.usrds.org/adr.aspx  Posted by AHA Resource Center (312) 422-2050, rc@aha.org

 

CANCER: 5-year survival rate improves in recent decades

Survival improved substantially over this time period for both whites and blacks overall (all sites) and for almost all cancer types…”

The overall five-year survival rate for cancer patients has improved in the past 40 years, according to national data in this fact-packed, scholarly article.

Looking at the more treatable cancers, here are the top five with the highest survival rates, based on recent data:

  • Prostate (99.3 percent five-year survival rate)
  • Thyroid (98.3 percent)
  • Skin (93.2 percent)
  • Breast (90.8 percent)
  • Uterine (83.4 percent)

Source: Jemal, A., and others. (2017). Annual report to the nation on the status of cancer, 1975-2014, featuring survival. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 109(9).  Click here for free full text: https://academic.oup.com/jnci/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jnci/djx030  Posted by AHA Resource Center (312) 422-2050 rc@aha.org

CONSUMER CHOICE: Nearly half of patients who need elective surgery bypass their local rural hospital for care

The bypass rate for elective surgical procedures at rural CAHs is 48.3%, similar to other estimates on surgery-related bypass.  This rate indicates that rural CAHs are losing a significant portion of people with surgical needs in their community to outside hospitals, thereby affecting their ability to continue offering other services in their community.”

The number of patients who chose to travel for elective surgical procedures, bypassing a closer critical access hospital, was studied based on 2011 data for four states: Colorado, North Carolina, Vermont and Wisconsin.  Patients who were found to be more likely to bypass the small local hospital included those undergoing elective orthopedic, ophthalmology, and digestive system procedures.

Source: Weigel, P.A.M., and others. (2017, Spring). Rural bypass for elective surgeries. Journal of Rural Health, 33(2), 135-145.  Click here for access to publisher’s website: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1111/jrh.12163/full  Posted by AHA Resource Center (312) 422-2050, rc@aha.org

EMERGENCY DEPARTMENTS: New capacity metric finds 6 ED beds per 10,000 ED visits in California hospitals

Our novel metrics capturing both supply of beds and visit demand demonstrate that recent trends of hospital supply may be insufficient to keep pace with growing ED patient demand and evolving, complex medical conditions.”

The change in supply of emergency department facilities and in demand for emergency care in California hospitals from 2005 to 2014 was studied using data from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD).  The total number of ED visits in California increased by about one-third over this ten-year period, reaching a total of over 13 million visits in 2015, or 342 ED visits/1,000 population.  The number of emergency departments in California remained about the same – 339 facilities in 2014 – but the number of ED beds increased about 30 percent to 7663 in 2014.

The researchers developed a new metric – ED bed supply per ED visit.  Over the ten-year study period, there was a small decrease of about 4 percent in this metric.  It was roughly 6 ED beds per 10,000 ED visits in both 2005 and 2014.

Sources:

Chow, J.L., Niedzwiecki, M.J., and Hsia, R.Y. (2017, May 11). Trends in the supply of California’s emergency departments and inpatient services, 2005-2014: A retrospective analysis. BMJ Open, 7(5).  Click here for free full text: http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/bmjopen/7/5/e014721.full.pdf

For more information on OSHPD data, click here: https://www.oshpd.ca.gov/HID/

Posted by AHA Resource Center (312) 422-2050, rc@aha.org