• Need more information on these or other topics? Ask an information specialist at (312) 422-2050 or rc@aha.org

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 245 other followers

  • Share this blog

    Share |
  • Note:

    Information posted in this blog does not necessarily represent the views of the American Hospital Association
  • Archives

  • Categories

  • Top Posts

  • Top Rated Posts

DESIGN: Innovative bed placement in patient rooms

Florida Hospital Waterman (Tavares, FL) experimented with a new patient room furniture arrangement when moving a 30-bed unit into some shelled space.  The idea was that patient satisfaction would increase if the headwalls of patient beds were NOT visible from the corridor.  This configuration was thought to increase privacy and decrease noise.  The architects studied the results on an existing unit and then on the new unit and found mixed results.  The patients did find the new unit quieter but caregivers were neutral about recommending the new design.

Sources:

Ferenc, J. (2016, July 20). Study tests one way to change patient room design and satisfaction. Health Facilities Management.  Click here:  http://www.hfmmagazine.com/articles/2342-study-tests-one-way-to-change-patient-room-design-and-satisfaction

GS&P wins Certificate of Research Excellence for study on patient room orientation. (2015, Oct. 16). Press release.  Click here: http://www.greshamsmith.com/news/awards/gs-amp-p-wins-core-award-for-study-on-patient-room   Posted by AHA Resource Center (312) 422-2050, rc@aha.org

Largest Hospital and Ambulatory Care EHR Vendors

The Office of the National Coordinator for Healthcare Information Technology (ONC) tracks the vendors used by providers that participate in its electronic health record (EHR) incentive program. ONC has released a list of all certified health IT vendors used by providers along with how many hospitals and ambulatory care professionals are using each vendor’s technology.

There were 175 certified health IT vendors supplying technology to 4,474 non-federal acute care participating hospitals as of June 2016. These ten vendors, ranked by the number of hospitals with certified EHR technology, were the largest suppliers:

  1. Cerner Corporation (1,029 hospitals)
  2. MEDITECH (953)
  3. Epic Systems Corporation (869)
  4. Evident (636)
  5. McKesson (462)
  6. MEDHOST (359)
  7. Allscripts  (235)
  8. Sunquest Information Systems (200)
  9. FairWarning Technologies (172)
  10. Iatric Systems (161)

On the ambulatory care side, 632 vendors supplied certified health IT to 337,432 ambulatory primary care physicians, medical and surgical specialists, podiatrists, optometrists, dentists, and chiropractors also participating in the Medicare EHR Incentive Program. These were the top ambulatory care EHR vendors based on the number of participating health care professionals using each vendor’s technology:

  1. Epic Systems Corporation (83,673 professionals)
  2. Allscripts (33,127)
  3. eClinical Works LLC (25,524)
  4. Next Gen Healthcare (19,676)
  5. GE Healthcare (17,704)
  6. Cerner Corporation (15,104)
  7. athenahealth Inc (14,570)
  8. Greenway Health LLC (12,407)
  9. Practice Fusion (8,523)
  10. McKesson (7,347)

Sources:

Hospital EHR vendors: certified health IT vendors and editions reported by hospitals participating in the Medicare EHR Incentive Program. Office of the National Coordinator for Healthcare Information Technology, June 2016. http://dashboard.healthit.gov/quickstats/pages/FIG-Vendors-of-EHRs-to-Participating-Hospitals.php

Health care professional EHR vendors: certified health IT vendors and editions reported by ambulatory health care professionals participating in the Medicare EHR incentive program. Office of the National Coordinator for Healthcare Information Technology, June 2016. http://dashboard.healthit.gov/quickstats/pages/FIG-Vendors-of-EHRs-to-Participating-Professionals.php

Posted by AHA Resource Center (312) 422-2050, rc@aha.org

DIVERSITY: Which efforts work at work? Which don’t?

The authors, who are sociology professors, studied diversity efforts in over 800 U.S. companies to draw conclusions about what works and what doesn’t.  Here are their findings.

Diversity efforts that actually make organizations LESS diverse

  • Mandatory diversity training for managers
  • Testing job applicants
  • Grievance systems

Diversity efforts that help increase diversity

  • Voluntary diversity training
  • Self-managed teams
  • Cross-training
  • College recruitment efforts that target women and minorities
  • Mentoring
  • Diversity task forces
  • Diversity managers

Source: Dobbin, F., and Kalev, A. (2016, July-Aug.). Why diversity programs fail.: And what works better. Harvard Business Review, 94(7/8), 52-60.  Click here: https://hbr.org/2016/07/why-diversity-programs-fail  Posted by AHA Resource Center (312) 422-2050, rc@aha.org

POPULATION HEALTH: Is violence a disease? Contagious?

Humans copy behavior.  Violence witnessed over time is contagious.  This concept and the development of the “cure violence model” is described in the opening article by Dr. Gary Slutkin in this issue of Health Progress devoted to “Suffering Violence.”  Dr. Slutkin propounds that:

“…violence is transmissible.  It behaves like all epidemics.  It has the exact characteristics of a contagious disease.  Violence as a public health problem is not merely a metaphor, it is a scientific fact.” (Slutkin, 2016, p. 5).

John Morrissey takes up the same theme and reports on violence prevention in West Baltimore.  Among these approaches included the investment by Bon Secours Hospital in vacant lots near the hospital.

Michael Romano describes the impact of work by CHI Franciscan Health in Tacoma to turn vacant lots into soccer fields, and other Catholic Health Initiatives projects.

There is more in this issue.  The entire magazine can be viewed here: https://www.chausa.org/publications/health-progress/issues/july-august-2016

Sources:

Slutkin, G. (2016, July-Aug.). Is violence ‘senseless’? Not according to science: Let’s make sense of it and treat it like a disease. Health Progress, 97(4), 5-8.  Click here: https://www.chausa.org/publications/health-progress/article/july-august-2016/is-violence-‘senseless’-not-according-to-science-let’s-make-sense-of-it-and-treat-it-like-a-disease

Morrissey, J. (2016, July-Aug.). Violence: A community health approach. Health Progress, 97(4), 9-14.  Click here: https://www.chausa.org/publications/health-progress/article/july-august-2016/violence-a-community-health-approach

Romano, M. (2016, July-Aug.). Why a trash-strewn lot became a soccer field. Health Progress, 94(4), 17-23.  Click here: https://www.chausa.org/publications/health-progress/article/july-august-2016/why-a-trash-strewn-lot-became-a-soccer-field  Posted by AHA Resource Center (312) 422-2050, rc@aha.org

SURGERY: Use of surgical robots has changed the way radical prostatectomy procedures are done in the U.S.

The volume of radical prostatectomy procedures decreased 7 percent from 1425 procedures per million men over age 45 in the late ’90s to 1330 per million in 2010-2011.  There was a big change, however, in the way that the surgery was performed as surgical robots came to the fore in urological surgery.  This study of national data shows that open radical prostatectomy procedures dropped from 1424 per million older men to 435 per million during the 14-year time period.  Much of that procedure volume was moved over to robotic surgery.

This study also analyzes hospital procedure volume – finding that 18 percent of hospitals stopped providing open radical prostatectomy since 2006.  The number of hospitals providing the minimally invasive version of the procedure increased by 191 percent during the same period.  The percentage of hospitals with a low-volume (fewer than 50 procedures) program of minimally invasive radical prostatectomy doubled – to 26 percent – by the end of the study period.

Source: Tyson, M.D., and others. (2016, Jan.). Radical prostatectomy trends in the United States: 1998 to 2011. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 91(1), 10-16.  Click here for full text: http://www.mayoclinicproceedings.org/article/S0025-6196%2815%2900771-5/pdf  Posted by AHA Resource Center (312) 422-2050, rc@aha.org

MEDICAL GROUPS: Top 10 largest in the U.S.

This is a study of large medical group practices, comparing characteristics of academic medical groups (“gown”) with those not linked to medical schools (“town”).  A large part of the study involved developing a list of the 100 largest practices – which included those from about 500 physicians at the bottom of the list of 100 to ten times that many at the top.  An average of about one-quarter of physicians in these large practices were primary care physicians (PCPs).  However, there was a smaller percentage of PCPs in the academic practices than in the community practices.

Top 10 Largest Physician Practices: U.S. 2013

  1. Northern California Permanente Medical Group (the largest with 5,634)
  2. Southern California Permanente Medical Group
  3. Harvard University
  4. Mayo Medical School
  5. Case Western Reserve University
  6. University of Pittsburgh
  7. University of Washington
  8. University of Michigan
  9. Johns Hopkins University
  10. University of Texas, Houston

Source: Welch, W.P., and Bindman, A.B. (2016, July). Town and gown differences among the 100 largest medical groups in the United States. Academic Medicine, 91(7), 1007-1014.  Click here: http://journals.lww.com/academicmedicine/Abstract/2016/07000/Town_and_Gown_Differences_Among_the_100_Largest.32.aspx  Posted by AHA Resource Center (312) 422-2050, rc@aha.org

TEACHING HOSPITALS: What is the July effect? Is it real?

The “July effect” refers to the detrimental impact on patient care, efficiency and outcomes in teaching hospitals when a new class of residents comes on board each year in the summer.  This is not just scuttlebutt.  The authors note several research studies that found that patient care takes longer, is more expensive, or more likely to have errors when the patient is hospitalized in July.  What to do?  The authors, who are associated with the University of Michigan, suggest a multi-pronged plan to address the July effect.  The first steps involve identifying and incentivizing outstanding physician educators who are willing to serve as July-able attendings and also grooming senior residents to be ready for leadership and teaching responsibilities in July.  Academic health systems can also invest more in simulation-based training and improving communications.

Source: Petrilli, C.M., Del Valle, J., and Chopra, V. (2016, July). Why July matters. Academic Medicine, 91(7), 910-912.  Click here: http://journals.lww.com/academicmedicine/Fulltext/2016/07000/Why_July_Matters.12.aspx  Posted by AHA Resource Center (312) 422-2050, rc@aha.org

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 245 other followers